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Videos show cops searching women's genitals for marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Wed, August, 7th 2013 by THCFinder
searched-for-marijuanaTwo disturbing videos, posted online Monday, appear to show Texas cops taking extreme and assaultive measures when searching two women for marijuana possession. The cops perform a full cavity search — including searching the stopped women’s vaginas and anuses — saying at one point in the recording, “We’re going to find it.” Crucially, in neither video were the women stopped for probable cause of marijuana possession; the police stopped one woman for speeding and the other for littering.
 
As Think Progress noted:
 
These searches almost certainly violate the Constitution. Although police do have broad latitude to search a vehicle when they have probable cause to believe that they will uncover contraband within, it is quite a stretch to extend these precedents to this most intimate of searches. As the Supreme Court explained in a 2009 decision regarding a student who was strip searched by school administrators, “both subjective and reasonable societal expectations of personal privacy support the treatment of such a search as categorically distinct, requiring distinct elements of justification on the part of school authorities for going beyond a search of outer clothing and belongings.”
 

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Uruguay To Sell Legal Marijuana At Low Price Of $2.5 Per Gram To Compete With Black Market

Category: News | Posted on Wed, August, 7th 2013 by THCFinder
selling-two-fifty-gramsGood news, Uruguayan potheads -- your weed habit is about to get a whole lot cheaper.
 
Uruguay's lower house passed an unprecedented bill last week that legalizes marijuana and regulates the production, distribution, and sale of weed for adult consumers. El Pais now reports via Univision that the bill fixes the price of marijuana around $2.50 per gram. The bill is up for vote in the Senate, where it is expected to be passed, and finally signed into law by President José Mujica, a longtime supporter of drug reform.
 
The debate surrounding the bill is nothing new: critics point to potential health and welfare consequences, while supporters hail the attempt to pragmatically address the widespread use of marijuana and the systemic failures of the global war on drugs. And as The Economist points out, countries like Portugal and the Netherlands have significantly decriminalized the possession and use of small amounts of pot.
 
What sets Uruguay's bill apart, however, is that it provides for government control over the entire marijuana industry, from cultivation to consumption. Individual citizens, cooperatives, and private companies can grow a specified amount of weed each month, though it may only be sold to consumers by state-run pharmacies. Purchasers will have to register with the state and will be limited to 40 grams per month.
 
Such regulations could deter Uruguay's 120,000 or so marijuana users from leaving the black market, which is where the price point comes into play. Foreign Policy's Park MacDougald notes that the government has two tools at its disposal to lure customers into the legal market it seeks to create: affordability and quality control. While InSight Crime reports that the current cost of pot varies by region and can reach up to about $5 per gram, Julio Calzada, Uruguay's drug czar, told El Pais that the proposed fixed price of $2.50 per gram is on par with the going underground rates, the hope being that the competitive pricing will attract users to the legal market without providing a profit incentive for resale in the black market.
 

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Cannabis discovered growing in Newport council potted plants

Category: News | Posted on Tue, August, 6th 2013 by THCFinder
cannabis-plants-potA flower box in a public street in Wales has been found to have been growing weed among its flowers, sparking up an investigation by Newport Council to work out who planted them – and then harvested them before they could be removed by officials.
 
The BBC reports local businessman Dean Beddis spotted the illegal plants among begonias and petunias.
 
"I had never seen cannabis growing in the wild before so it was crazy to see it," Beddis told BBC.
 
"It's actually rather a beautiful plant and stood out wonderfully. But they have gone now. I don't know who took them."
 
Council officers are now scouring CCTV footage and getting the police involved.
 
While councillor Rhys Hutchings saw an amusing side.
 
"It's either kids or the Newport underworld community - I'm pretty sure it's not Alan Titchmarsh," he joked.
 
The Gwent Police admit they’ll struggle for a conviction now the plants are gone.
 
Source: 

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DEA Uses Spy Data To Launch Drug Investigations, Then Hide Their Origins

Category: News | Posted on Tue, August, 6th 2013 by THCFinder
dea-spyingAt an undisclosed location in Virginia, a publicity-shy DEA unit is feeding surveillance data from the National Security Agency (NSA), as well as wiretaps, informants, and a massive DEA phone record database, to law enforcement officials around the country to help them launch criminal investigations of American citizens. Reuters broke the story with an investigative report Monday.
 
Law enforcement has been directed to conceal how those investigations really began, deceiving not only defense attorneys, but also prosecutors and judges, raising serious questions about the propriety and even the constitutionality of the practice.
 
“The DEA increasingly qualifies as a rogue agency – one that Congress needs to immediately investigate,” said Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance. “This latest scandal may well be just the tip of the iceberg,” he added, referring to the agency’s checkered past.
 
“It’s remarkable how little scrutiny the DEA faces from Congress or other federal overseers,” Nadelmann continued.  “With an annual budget of over $2 billion as well as significant discretionary powers, DEA certainly merits a top-to-bottom review of its operations, expenditures and discretionary actions.”
 
The DEA unit in question is the Special Operations Division (SOD), which was created in 1994 to combat Latin American drug trafficking organizations. Its members also include the FBI, CIA, NSA, IRS, and Department of Homeland Security, among two dozen partner agencies. Since its inception, SOD has grown from several dozen employees to several hundred, Reuters reported.
 
Most of its work is classified and is intended to remain confidential. But Reuters managed to get its hands on key documents, including the one quoted from below.
 

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Poll says Kentuckians favor varying Marijuana access

Category: News | Posted on Tue, August, 6th 2013 by THCFinder
kentucky-cannabisCannabis, weed, pot and marijuana; it's a plant with many names, but no matter what you call it, the topic has been a political lightning rod for years.
 
“Just because it's raising revenues, we have to be very careful not to make mistakes,” former California governor Arnold Swarzenegger said.
 
Many states allow for the medicinal use of marijuana. Colorado and Washington have officially legalized it for recreational purposes, but where is Kentucky’s voice in the wake of all this change? Recent data put forward by the Kentucky Health Issues Poll sheds light on just that.
 
“We've all heard that marijuana is a gateway drug, and i'm here to assure you that it is,” Dan Smoot said.
 
The poll found that 78 percent of Kentucky adults support the legalization of marijuana for medical purposes, additionally four out of 10 favor uses for any purpose. Members of Kentucky law enforcement say that second figure is particularly disturbing.
 
“ It makes me furious, we have so many people addicted in this region and the vast majority of those people started with marijuana,” Smoot said.
 
Most individuals tell us it's easy to get, especially amongst the younger population. It’s cheap. It’s easily accessible so i think it's cool,” Amy Yates said.
 
Read more: http://www.wkyt.com

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Initiative Campaign To Legalize Cannabis Launched In Wyoming

Category: News | Posted on Mon, August, 5th 2013 by THCFinder
wyoming-medical-marijuanaThe newly-formed Wyoming chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) has launched an initiative drive aimed at legalizing cannabis in one of the most conservative states in the nation.
 
“We don’t like being told what to do by the federal government,” states Christine Christian, Executive Director of Wyoming NORML, “And Wyoming doesn’t like regulations and having our money go somewhere else.”
 
The group is hoping to put their initiative to a vote of the people in 2016, the next presidential election; they’ll be required to collect roughly 37,000 valid signatures to do so.
 
Under current Wyoming law, the possession of even a few grams of cannabis can result in a misdemeanor that carries with it up to a year in prison, something that Christian believes creates more harm than good; “There are way too many people in jail over possessing minor amounts of marijuana… All we are doing is sending them to jail and making them better criminals.”
 

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