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If you own Medical Marijuana, your gun might get you Jail time!

Category: News | Posted on Tue, March, 26th 2013 by THCFinder
In 2011, the ATF issued a memo that declared that it is illegal for anyone with a medical-marijuana card to possess a gun or ammunition.
 
Monday I came across a U.S. Sentencing Commission report that looked at  federal offenders serving sentence enhancements for committing a crime with a gun present: 65 percent served five years for having a gun while committing a federal crime, 23 percent served seven years for brandishing a gun, and nine percent served ten years for firing a gun or carrying assault weapons or other proscribed firearms. It’s possible that in some of those 65 percent of cases, the guns weren’t part of the crime, but the crime was owning a gun while possessing a controlled substance. Which brought to mind the 55-year sentence meted out to Weldon Angelos, which the sentencing judge himself called “unjust, cruel, and even irrational.” 
 
The message for Californians who use medical marijuana should be pretty clear. The federal government may go after you for using marijuana, and the penalty can be harsh if you possess both legal (in California) medical marijuana and a lawfully-owned gun.
 
Fortunately, there is a mechanism for mercy. Sens. Pat Leahy, D-Vt., and Rand Paul, R-Ky., are working together on legislation to grant federal judges more judicial discretion under the federal mandatory minimum sentencing system. 
 

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Packed house for 'how-to' school for growing, selling marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Sun, March, 24th 2013 by THCFinder
The passage of Initiative 502 has opened doors to a new industry centered on legal marijuana use.  Saturday the Washington Cannabis Institute hosted an event hosted an event to teach would-be growers and sellers what they need to know about the pot business. 
 
More than 60 people crowded in a small conference room to find out how it all works and organizers say they had to turn people away.  The event featured speakers who talked about growing it, selling it and following the rules.
 
“There's a lot of risk in this industry,” George Boyadjian explained. 
Boyadjian runs several medical marijuana operations and says the two-day seminar is often a reality check for those who attend.
 
“Our job is not scare people away from the business, our job is to educate them about how to get into the business legally and what they could be facing if things go wrong,” he said.
 
Some like Bryan Hood say they're hesitant to consider running an operation under I-502. 
“From what I see I don't think it's going to work, I think the farmers are going to get screwed,” he explained.
 

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UFC exec asks for softer stance against marijuana users

Category: News | Posted on Fri, March, 22nd 2013 by THCFinder
LAS VEGAS – If UFC exec Marc Ratner has his way, fighters testing positive for marijuana following bouts in Nevada would be treated very differently than those who are busted for using performance-enhancing drugs.
 
During Thursday's meeting of the Nevada State Athletic Commission's Steroid and Drug Testing Advisory Panel, Ratner asked that the commission evaluate how it handles fighters who test positive for marijuana.
 
"Society is changing," Ratner said. "It's a different world now than when I was on the commission. States are legalizing marijuana, and it's becoming more and more of a problem with fighters testing positive (for marijuana) and the metabolites."
 

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Marijuana decriminalization passes N.H. House

Category: News | Posted on Fri, March, 22nd 2013 by THCFinder
CONCORD — The N.H. House passed a bill Thursday decriminalizing the possession of small amounts of marijuana for the fourth time in five years.
 
However, it is still unlikely the state will join its neighbors in Maine, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut in decriminalizing marijuana, as Gov. Maggie Hassan has said she is not in favor of decriminalization and the Senate has shot down each of the recent attempts by the House to pass such a law.
 
Bill supporters argued it's time to end the prohibition of marijuana, which they said doesn't have public support and is a financial and regulatory burden on the state. In addition, they said legal substances like alcohol and tobacco have worse health and societal effects.
 
"A criminal offense and a criminal record can do much more harm than a small amount of marijuana," Rep. Joel Winters, D-Nashua said, during debate on the House floor.
 
The House voted 214-115 to pass the bill reducing the penalty for possession of up to a quarter ounce of marijuana to a fine of up to $200. The bill would also require those 18 and under to attend drug rehabilitation classes or face a $1,000 fine.
 

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Over Federal Objections, Maryland Senate Approves Decriminalizing Marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Thu, March, 21st 2013 by THCFinder
The Maryland Senate approved decriminalizing of possession of small amounts of marijuana over the objections of federal law enforcement Tuesday, the Washington Post reports.
 
Maryland joins other states and cities across the country decriminalizing pot. Colorado and Washington, for instance, have legalized marijuana.
 
Unlike like full legalization in those states, Maryland makes it a civil fine of up to $100 for possession of small amounts of pot, the Post repots.
 
Federal authorities have been debating how do deal with marijuana laws that conflict with federal law.
 

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NYPD Spent 1 Million Hours Over Last Decade On Marijuana Arrests

Category: News | Posted on Wed, March, 20th 2013 by THCFinder
New York Police Department officers have spent 1 million hours making 440,000 marijuana arrests between 2002 and 2012, according to a new report from the Drug Policy Alliance. DPA put together the data in response to a request from New York City and New York State, as they consider measures to decriminalize marijuana. Each of these arrests can cost $1,000 to $2,000, according to a 2011 DPA estimate, costing New York City $75 million in just a single year (2010). The report explains:
 
In our ongoing research about marijuana possession arrests in New York, we have found that a basic misdemeanor arrest for marijuana possession in New York City varied from a minimum of two or three hours for one officer, to four or five hours or even longer for multiple officers. [...]
 
We multiplied 2.5 hours by the number of lowest‐level marijuana possession arrests (charged under NYS Penal Law 221.10) for each year since 2002 when Mayor Bloomberg took office. […] That is the equivalent of having 31 police officers working eight hours a day, 365 days a year, for 11 years, making only marijuana possession arrests. [...]
 
Two officers for five hours equals four million hours of police time. This does not include the time spent by police supervisors or by corrections, court, and prosecutor staff, nor the time officers spent searching for people to arrest.
 

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