Search:
Login:
OR

News

NFL Upholds Josh Gordons 1 Year Suspension For Marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Thu, August, 28th 2014 by THCFinder
josh-gordon-suspended-for-1-year-from-nflThe NFL suspended Cleveland Browns receiver Josh Gordon for an entire year after he ‘failed’ a drug test, testing positive for marijuana. I say ‘failed’ because he took two tests. The first one he barely passed, and the second one he barely failed. The NFL has a very low threshold for a positive marijuana test compared to other sports. The NFL considers anything over 15 nanograms per milliliter to be a fail. Josh Gordon’s first test was 13.63 ng/ml, and his second was 16 ng/ml.
 
Josh Gordon appealed his suspension with the NFL, and rightfully so. Why should someone be suspended at all for having 1 ng/ml more than the threshold, especially for an entire year? To put the test result into perspective, the Olympics allow up to 150 ng/ml – ten times what the NFL allows. To say that the NFL has reefer madness is a huge understatement. Per NFL.Com:
 
“Appeals officer Harold Henderson has upheld the suspension for the 2014 NFL season of Cleveland Browns wide receiver Josh Gordon for violating the NFL Policy and Program for Substances of Abuse. The suspension is effective immediately,” the league said Wednesday in a statement.
 
Josh Gordon’s suspension is insane, especially when compared to the suspension of two games that Ray Rice got for assaulting his then fiance to the point that she was knocked unconscious. As many Josh Gordon fans and marijuana supporters pointed out, Ray Rice would have to knock out 7 more women to get the same suspension as Josh Gordon. Even more if you include preseason and playoff games. I don’t say this to be mean or insensitive, I say it to highlight the insanity that is the NFL’s marijuana policy. Shame on the NFL.
 

Comments

Federal Government To Grow 30 Times More Marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Wed, August, 27th 2014 by THCFinder
fed-goverment-to-grow-30-times-more-mjThe federal government has been growing marijuana for multiple decades at the University of Mississippi. The marijuana is grown ‘for research’ and to supply four federal medical marijuana patients. The federal government also owns several patents for marijuana. The sad irony of course being that the federal government prohibits all forms of marijuana outside of their monopoly, and actively enforces marijuana prohibition, even in states that have legalized it in various forms.
 
Recently the federal government decided to ramp up production of marijuana at the University of Mississippi. And they are not just ramping it up a little, they are increasing production more than 3,000%. Per the Federal Register:
 
The DEA received one comment on the notice with request for comments. The commenter supported the adjusted 2014 aggregate production quota for marijuana. The DEA appreciates the support for this adjusted 2014 aggregate production quota for marijuana which will provide for the estimated scientific, research, and industrial needs of the United States.
 
The DEA has taken into consideration the one comment received during the 30-day period and the Administrator has determined, pursuant to Section 306 of the CSA (21 U.S.C. 826), based on all of the above, and for the reasons stated in the May 5, 2014, notice, that the adjusted established 2014 aggregate production quota for marijuana to be manufactured in the United States in 2014 to provide for the estimated scientific, research, and industrial needs of the United States, and the establishment and maintenance of reserve stocks, expressed in grams of anhydrous acid or base, shall remain as follows:
 
Previously established 2014 quota – 21,000 g. Adjusted 2014 quota – 650,000 g.
 
There isn’t a clear reason why the federal government is ramping up production. For a government who’s official stance is that marijuana doesn’t have any medical value, they sure do plan on producing a lot of marijuana for medical research. It’s beyond time to give up the sham, and reschedule marijuana, or even better, eliminate marijuana prohibition altogether.
 

Comments

In States With Medical Marijuana, Painkiller Deaths Drop by 25%

Category: News | Posted on Tue, August, 26th 2014 by THCFinder
mmj-helping-with-painkiller-deaths
America has a major problem with prescription pain medications like Vicodin and OxyContin. Overdose deaths from these pharmaceutical opioids have approximately tripled since 1991, and every day 46 people die of such overdoses in the United States.
 
However, in the 13 states that passed laws allowing for the use of medical marijuana between 1999 and 2010, 25 percent fewer people die from opioid overdoses annually.
 
“The difference is quite striking,” said study co-author Colleen Barry, a health policy researcher at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. The shift showed up quite quickly and become visible the year after medical marijuana was accepted in each state, she told Newsweek
 
In the study, published today August 25 in JAMA Internal Medicine, the researchers hypothesize that in states where medical marijuana can be prescribed, patients may use pot to treat pain, either instead of prescription opiates, or to supplement them—and may thus require a lower dosage that is less likely to lead to a fatal problem.
 
As with most findings involving marijuana and public policy, however, not everyone agrees on a single interpretation of the results.
 
It certainly can be said that marijuana is much less toxic than opiates like Percocet or morphine, and that it is “basically impossible” to die from an overdose of weed, Barry said. Based on those agreed-upon facts, it would seem that an increased use in marijuana instead of opiates for chronic pain is the most obvious explanation of the reduction in overdose deaths.
 
Not so fast, said Dr. Andrew Kolodny, chief medical officer at Phoenix House, a national nonprofit addiction treatment agency. He said that the immediate reduction in overdose deaths is extremely unlikely to be due to the substitute use of the herb, for one simple reason: Marijuana isn’t widely prescribed for chronic pain.
 
“You don’t have primary care doctors in these states [prescribing] marijuana instead of Vicodin,” he said. Even in states where medical marijuana is legal, it is only prescribed by a small subset of doctors, and, therefore, probably couldn’t explain the huge decrease in opiate-related overdose deaths.
 
Kolodny says the study results are more likely due to a host of factors. One example is differences in state policies to cut down on over-prescribing of opiate medications. Also, many people who overdose on painkillers are already addicted, and these individuals are naturally among the most likely to take too much, Kolodny told Newsweek. States that pass progressive laws to treat addiction may be more likely to lower their rates of overdose deaths; for political reasons these states may also be more likely to legalize medical marijuana.
 

Comments

Marijuana amendment would cancel Florida 'bong ban,' advocate says

Category: News | Posted on Mon, August, 25th 2014 by THCFinder
bong-ban-in-fl-could-be-liftedTALLAHASSEE — Marijuana legalization advocates might have another reason to rejoice if Florida voters approve a proposed constitutional amendment allowing pot for medical use.
 
The initiative's passage also will pre-empt Florida's “bong ban,” which forbids the sale of pipes used to smoke the plant, said the head of the drive behind the amendment.
 
Ben Pollara, campaign manager of United for Care, pointed out that the amendment's definition of marijuana's “medical use” includes “related supplies.”
 
Anything now outlawed as drug paraphernalia, including “metal, wooden, acrylic, glass, stone, plastic, or ceramic pipes,” may be legally sold if used to smoke marijuana to treat a medical condition, Pollara told the Tribune/Scripps Capital Bureau.
 
That could even include a “2-liter-type soda bottle,” which state legislators have banned if used with a controlled substance.
 
Jon Mills, the former University of Florida Levin College of Law dean who drafted the amendment's language, didn't take issue with Pollara's interpretation.
 
“Pragmatically, though, I expect the Legislature will go back and further define what is and what is not (illegal) paraphernalia,” said Mills, who also served as speaker of the Florida House in 1987-88.
 
“But certainly, if you were arrested for having drug paraphernalia and were using marijuana medically, you'd make the argument your device was included” in the amendment's definition, he added.
 
Also in agreement is Sandy D'Alemberte, former Florida State University president and law school dean and past American Bar Association president.
 
“If devices that best administer medical marijuana are on the list” of drug paraphernalia, “then on the face of it, it sounds like you'd have a pretty good argument you weren't breaking the law,” he said.
 
“Ultimately, of course, a court would have to decide,” added D'Alemberte, who also chaired the Florida Constitution Revision Commission in 1977-78.
 
Read more: http://tbo.com

Comments

Steelers Running Backs Bell, Blount Likely To Be Charged With Marijuana Possession

Category: News | Posted on Thu, August, 21st 2014 by THCFinder
steelers-player-to-be-charged-with-marijuanaPITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Pittsburgh Steelers running backs Le’Veon Bell and LeGarrette Blount will likely face charges of marijuana possession following a traffic stop Wednesday afternoon in Ross Township.
According to Ross Township Police, it all started around 1:30 p.m. along busy McKnight Road when a motorcycle officer who was stopped at a red light smelled marijuana coming from a black Camaro
 
Officer Sean Stafiej pulled the car over in the parking lot of Pool City.
Police say Bell was driving, Blount was in the front passenger seat and an unidentified female was in the back seat of the vehicle.
 
Investigators say Officer Stafiej also found a Ziploc-style bag containing about 20 grams of marijuana on the console.
 
Ross Township Police say the three “admitted to collectively possessing the bag of marijuana.”
 
Police say Bell, Blount and the woman were cooperative with the officer.
 
Bell was taken to UPMC Passavant Hospital to have blood drawn under suspicion of driving under the influence of marijuana.
 
All three have been released from police custody. They are likely to face possession charges.
 
Bell could also face charges of DUI of marijuana.
 
“No one has been charged yet. The case is still being investigated,” said Ross Township Police Detective Brian Kohlhepp. “However, we do anticipate charges of possession against all three individuals. And in addition to that, we took Mr. Bell to UPMC Passavant for blood draw for suspicion of DUI for driving under the influence of marijuana.”
 
Police say they will be notified of charges by mail.
 
The traffic stop was just one hour before the Steelers’ charter plane was scheduled to take off for Philadelphia.
 

Comments

Canada Court Rules In Favor Of Marijuana Edibles And Topicals

Category: News | Posted on Tue, August, 19th 2014 by THCFinder
marijuana-edibles-and-topicals-canadaMarijuana infused products are not new, but they are certainly growing in popularity. Marijuana edibles like brownies and cookies are a great way to medicate. They don’t require inhaling anything, and the effects can be felt for a lot longer compared to inhaling vapor or smoke. Marijuana topicals are very effective at treating arthritis and tendinitis. I have bad tendinitis, and the only thing that works for me is marijuana topicals. Pharmaceuticals, over the counter or prescription, have done nothing for me.
 
Health Canada allows medical marijuana to be consumed by patients in Canada, however, the rules only allow consumption and sales of dried marijuana. That is, until a B.C. Court of Appeals judge ruled prohibition of marijuana infused products to be unconstitutional. Per CBC:
 
In her written reasons, Justice Risa Levine said this specification “is arbitrary and cannot be justified in a free and democratic society.”
 
Levine went on to state that when patients choose to use edible forms of marijuana, it “was a matter of necessity, or put another way, the restriction to dried marijuana interfered with their physical or psychological integrity.”
 
I have no idea why marijuana infused products were banned in the first place in Canada. Marijuana is medicine, whether it be in smoke, vapor, edible, or topical form. If a person is qualified as a medical marijuana patient, then they should be allowed to consume medical marijuana in whatever form they choose. A ‘one size fits all’ approach is harmful to patients. I’m glad the B.C. Court did the right thing.
 

Comments


Search








Blog Categories

Popular Articles

Latest Offers In Your Area
Recent Blog Posts
Download Our App!
5.3 Miles Away | North Hollywood,
2.7 Miles Away | Burbank,
13.4 Miles Away | Los Angeles ,
October 30, 2014 | Category: Nugs
October 30, 2014 | Category: Recipes
October 30, 2014 | Category: Fun
Mobile Apps
Copyright 2014 THCFinder.com
All Rights Reserved.
Dispensaries      Strains      About Us      Friends      API / Widgets      Privacy Policy      Terms of Use      Investors      Contact Us