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Lawyer Leads Effort To Add Marijuana Law To Michigan Bar Association

Category: News | Posted on Wed, April, 29th 2015 by THCFinder

michigan marijuana bar associationThe race is on to see which attorneys in Michigan will be among the first 50 to indicate their support for creating a marijuana law section of the Michigan Bar Association, according to Lapeer attorney Bernard Jocuns.

Jocuns leads the effort to petition the Association to create an attorney’s group devoted to discussing and advising on the subject of marijuana law.

“We need a minimum of fifty lawyers to indicate their support,” Jocuns said, although he expects to receive far more emails than that from attorneys certifying their interest.

A marijuana law section could issue papers, advise the legislature or offer educational seminars to raise awareness of the evolving state of marijuana law in Michigan, Jocuns said. “It’s an opportunity for lawyers to exchange ideas,” Jocuns explained.

“The goal is for people to get educated, and for there to be a body of educated lawyers that can speak with authority.”

Other attorneys around the state are in support of the idea. “Medical marihuana is important to the Citizens of Michigan, and states are adopting legislation for the adult recreational use of marihuana at an increasing pace. The State Bar of Michigan must recognize the important role cannabis and laws relating to its responsible use now play, and should do so by establishing a section focused on these rapidly evolving issues,” said Daniel Grow, a lawyer that practices criminal law across southwest Michigan, with a focus on issues relating to medical marijuana.

“Marijuana law is one of the most rapidly changing and misunderstood areas of law in our state,” said Farris Haddad, a Southfield attorney. “We are all affected by marijuana law in one way or another-so it’s a valid candidate for its own bar section.”

“It would really help take away some of the taboo that surrounds marijuana,” Jocuns offered. “Prosecutors are not the enemy.”

Attorney Matthew Abel of Cannabis Counsel in Detroit said, “Marijuana law intersects with numerous areas of law.  We hope this section will receive wide participation.”

Criminal law is only one aspect of the legal spectrum where marijuana issues are resolved. “This is not just a criminal issue,” Jocuns offered. He included attorneys specializing in family law, business law and even agriculture law specialists as potential members of the marijuana law section.

Read More:http://www.theweedblog.com/lawyer-leads-effort-to-add-marijuana-law-to-michigan-bar-association/


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The Marijuana Industry And Its First Crossroads

Category: News | Posted on Mon, April, 27th 2015 by THCFinder

Marijuana has come a long way in the United States since California launched its first-in-the-nation medical program 19 years ago. Today, 23 states and the District of Columbia have legalized cannabis to some degree, and public perception of the plant is clearly shifting. Medical marijuana is being used in treatment of a variety of illnesses including several types of seizures, cancer and post-traumatic stress disorder.

New polls by GallupBeyond the Beltway, and General Social Survey all show that for the first time since its prohibition, a majority of Americans support legalization of the plant. Change is coming to the American cannabis industry, and it’s time to prepare for it in earnest.

Marijuana is now on the cusp of mainstream legitimacy, and established business interests are beginning to work with the initial trailblazers of the American cannabis market. Further, while technological innovation is revolutionizing everyindustry, breakthrough ideas in a market as young this one have the chance to become defining cornerstones. Early-to-market products and solutions are seeing widespread adoption in absence of entrenched industry leaders.

New technology firms are playing a major part in increasing the efficiency, transparency, and security of the legal cannabis market. MJ FreewayBioTrack THC, and Agrisoft have all developed software to track the plant from seed-to-sale, protecting the integrity of the supply chain at every step. Additionally, I constantly see proposals from developers aiming to find new ways to connect grower to sellers and sellers to consumers.

Read More:http://techcrunch.com/2015/04/25/the-marijuana-industry-and-its-first-crossroads/#.gxbm39:2QIZ


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Marijuana Is Not, Repeat Not, a Gateway Drug

Category: News | Posted on Mon, April, 27th 2015 by THCFinder

With states legalizing marijuana by popular vote, some politicians, including Boston mayor Marty Walsh and New Jersey governor Chris Christie, are still calling marijuana a gateway drug.

The gateway theory argues that because heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine users often used marijuana before graduating to harder drugs, it must be a “gateway” to harder drug use. The theory implies that there is a causal mechanism that biologically sensitizes drug users, making them more willing to try—and more desirous of—harder drugs.

Yet the gateway hypothesis doesn’t make sense to those who use marijuana or have used in the past. Research shows that the vast majority of marijuana usersdo not go on to use hard drugs. Most stop using after entering the adult social world of family and work.

So why is it still part of the rhetoric and controversy surrounding the drug? A closer look reveals the historical roots—and vested interests—that are keeping the myth alive.

Explaining hard drug use

When analyzing what acts as a “gateway” to hard drug use, there are a number of factors at play. None involve marijuana.

Read More:http://www.newsweek.com/marijuana-not-gateway-drug-325358


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Missouri Lawmaker Proposes Taxing Illegal Drugs

Category: News | Posted on Sun, April, 26th 2015 by THCFinder

While the Missouri legislature can barely loosen their collective sphincter to allow the passing of an ultra-restrictive medical marijuana program, one snidely lawmaker is working to ensure the state gets its fair share of the illegal drug trade.

Earlier this month, State Representative Shawn Rhoads submitted a proposal (House Bill 1138) that aims to generate tax revenue from marijuana and other illegal drugs by implementing a hypocritical policy that forces drug dealers to shell out a percentage of their dope proceeds to supplement the state’s coffers.

The goal of this seemingly ridiculous measure is to follow in the footsteps of some 20 states across nation that require members of the black market drug trade to purchase state-issued tax stamps and apply them to their products. This method of financial madness, in turn, holds the proprietors of back alley dope slinging operations responsible for reporting their taxable income to the state.

Interestingly, although many characters of the underground working as amateur pharmaceutical representatives consider this controversial form of taxation a laughable matter, the law can actually come with some serious consequences for the ones who find themselves busted without tax stamps on illegal contraband.

In 2008, The New York Times reported that tax officials in Tennessee penalized a young dealer to the tune of $11,506 after he was caught selling marijuana-infused Rice Krispie Treats at a concert – a small fine in comparison to another dealer busted in the Volunteer State, who was charged $1.1 million for smuggling just over 42 grams of weed without tax stamps. 

Read More:http://www.hightimes.com/read/missouri-lawmaker-proposes-taxing-illegal-drugs


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Baby Boomers Increasingly Behind Legalizing Marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Sat, April, 25th 2015 by THCFinder

The support for legalizing marijuana has grown rapidly over the last decade but the oldest Americans aren't ready to sign off on it yet. Four states and Washington, D.C. have passed measures legalizing marijuana, and today 53 percent of Americans favor legalization and 44 are opposed. In 2006, those numbers stood at 32 percent in favor of legalization and 60 percent opposed, according to a survey from Pew Research Center.

The numbers have grown because of support among Baby Boomers, the group that came after them, Generation Xers, and the most recent generation, Millennials (those 18 to 34).

Some 68 percent of Millennials, 52 percent of Gen Xers and 50 percent of Baby Boomers, those 51 to 69, support legalization.

What's holding the numbers back are those 70 to 87 who are known as the Silent Generation with only 29 percent favoring legalizing marijuana.

"We know this generation expresses more conservative views on a range of issues-- marijuana, marriage equality and others-- and they came of age when opinion was predominantly against legalization of marijuana," says Alec Tyson, a senior researcher at Pew. "There has been a modest shift in their views. They have become slightly more likely to favor marijuana legalization but they came in age at a time when opinion was lopsided against legalization and landscape was much different in terms of state laws that allow medicinal or recreational use as you see today."

Only 8 percent of the Silent Generation supported marijuana legalization in 1997, showing that group has gained some acceptance of the issue. From a previous survey by Pew, that generation was more likely to say it's morally wrong, Tyson says.

"We do know that generation has much more negative views of the harms of the drug itself," Tyson says. "They're more likely to see it as dangerous and harmful." (Remember, that's the generation that grew up with the film Reefer Madness).

Read More:http://www.huffingtonpost.com/buck-wargo/baby-boomers-marijuana_b_7079040.html


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Missouri House Passes Bill To Legalize Hemp Cultivation

Category: News | Posted on Sat, April, 25th 2015 by THCFinder

missouri hempHemp is a very versatile plant. Some estimates say that hemp can be used to make over 25,000 products. Importing hemp and hemp products is legal in the United States, but hemp cultivation is not allowed at the federal level. Even in states that have legalized hemp cultivation, farmers are having a hard time getting an actual crop started due to federal prohibition (such as in Oregon). Missouri used to be one of the top hemp producing states in America. Missouri’s House of Representatives passed a hemp cultivation bill this week. Per The Joint Blog:

Missouri’s House of Representatives has given initial approval to House Bill 830, a proposal to legalize the production and cultivation of industrial hemp. A companion bill,Senate Bill 255, has already been approved unanimously by the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Food Production and Outdoor Resources.

If passed into law, House Bill 830 would remove hemp from the state’s list of controlled substance, reclassifying it as a legal agricultural product in the state. The bill would establish a system of licensing and regulations for those wanting to grow the crop, which would be defined as having no more than 0.3% THC. The proposal explicitly states that a change in federal law – or approval from the federal government – will not be required for the state to begin implementation of the law.

Missouri’s farmers deserve to grow a crop that is completely harmless. Virtually all of the arguments against hemp cultivation are not based upon science, but instead are based upon politics and fear mongering. The focus now moves to the Missouri Senate, where I’m hopeful it will pass considering SB 255 already received a unanimous approval from a key Senate Committee. A thriving hemp industry would help out Missouri quite a bit.

Source:http://www.theweedblog.com/missouri-house-passes-bill-to-legalize-hemp-cultivation/


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