Obama to Call for Breaking Cycle of Incarceration

Category: News | Posted on Mon, November, 2nd 2015 by THCFinder

WASHINGTON (AP) -- More than half a million people leave U.S. prisons each year, but with jobs, housing and mental health services scarce, many are soon back behind bars. On Monday, President Barack Obama will call for breaking that cycle of incarceration by helping former inmates successfully re-enter society.

With his visit to a drug treatment center in Newark, New Jersey, Obama aims to boost his ongoing push for overhauling the criminal justice system. In rare bipartisan fashion, Congress is considering legislation cutting sentences for nonviolent drug offenders, but Obama will seek to force attention to the plight offenders face once they're finally set free.

"Everyone has a role to play, from businesses that are hiring ex-offenders to philanthropies that are supporting education and training programs," Obama said in his weekly address.

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A Very Big California Marijuana Legalization Announcement Is Coming Tomorrow

Category: News | Posted on Sun, November, 1st 2015 by THCFinder
sean parker california marijuana

(image via wikipedia)

California is the biggest marijuana legalization domino that is in play for 2016. I have had many conversations with members of the mainstream media about California, and I have said many times that many people will measure the success of the 2016 campaign by whether or not California succeeds. Several states could legalize in 2016, and while I think that even one state would be a huge victory, many others will consider it bittersweet if California fails to legalize again.

As seems to always be the case with legalization efforts in this decade, there are several efforts in California. The most high profile one to date is Reform California, which has funding and a very strong campaign team. However, there’s supposed to be a long awaited announcement coming out of California tomorrow, with California billionaire Sean Parker and friends throwing their hat into the race. The initiative is reported to be backed by the Drug Policy Alliance, the Marijuana Policy Project, and WeedMaps founder Justin Hartfield who has already pledged 2 million dollars to a marijuana legalization campaign of his choosing (which it sounds like he is choosing this one).

Having a lot of money is important in politics, and this initiative will certainly have a bunch, but it’s not the only thing that it will take to push this initiative over the top. It will take a very well written initiative, and a strong campaign team to ensure victory. It sounds like the initiative that is going to be announced tomorrow will have those in addition to a hefty bank account. Anything that the Drug Policy Alliance is involved with is usually very solid. The San Francisco Chronicle received an advanced summary of the initiative, highlights of which are below:

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Phoenix marijuana convention draws job seekers, entrepreneurs

Category: News | Posted on Sat, October, 31st 2015 by THCFinder

PHOENIX — More than 2,000 people attended the inaugural Southwest Cannabis Conference and Expo at the Phoenix Convention Center this past week.

Some came to hawk their products. Some came to learn more about the future of the cannabis business. And some came to find jobs.

Culinary student Lyberty Wester said she picked up business cards from area dispensaries that make chocolate products because she’d like to become a chocolatier. But her options are limited in Arizona.

“It’s a little more difficult to think about even trying to be a cannabis chef because it’s a specific product, and that product isn’t legal (recreationally),” she said.

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Double Standard? Marijuana Or Hemp? DEA Indian Tribe Raid Raises Questions

Category: News | Posted on Fri, October, 30th 2015 by THCFinder

Menominee marijuana hempBy Phillip Smith

Taking advantage of a 2014 Justice Department memo giving Indian tribes a green light to participate in marijuana commerce, as well as a 2014 congressional vote allowing for industrial hemp pilot programs, Wisconsin’s Menominee Tribe earlier this year planted some 30,000 cannabis plants as part of a pilot project with the College of the Menominee Nation.

Last Friday, the DEA came and cut them all down.

The DEA says the plants were marijuana plants; the tribe says they were hemp plants. In either case, tribal officials and marijuana reform advocates don’t understand why the grow was raided. Even if it were marijuana, it appears to be an operation well within Justice Department guidelines. And that’s leading to some pointed questions about whether the feds have one standard for pot-legal states and another for the tribe-legal jurisdictions.

The memo that allows for marijuana commerce on the reservation includes eight potential enforcement triggers first formulated in a 2013 Justice Department memo (the Cole memo) advising federal prosecutors to lay off of recreational and medical marijuana operations in states where they are legal. Those triggers include diversion to other localities, money going to organized crime, and violence associated with the trade, among others.

The raid came after the tribe allowed a Bureau of Indian Affairs employee and local police to inspect the operation and take plant samples. And that visit came after a meeting between the BIA agent, the local cops, and an assistant US attorney.

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8 Ways To Support Marijuana Reform That Cost Little To No Money

Category: News | Posted on Thu, October, 29th 2015 by THCFinder
serra frank 420 mommy idaho medical marijuana cannabis

(image from

I get asked all of the time how people can support marijuana reform. Most of the time the question is being asked by someone who admits ahead of time that they don’t have money to donate, but that they still want to help. I know first hand what it’s like to be an activist with meager resources (cubicle warriors united!), but I don’t let that stop me from helping in other ways. Below are eight ways to help support reform that cost little to no money (just internet connection and stamps). If you think of other ways, by all means add them in the comments so that others can do them too:

  1. Contact your elected officials – Your elected officials have the power to introduce pro-marijuana measures. As such, contacting them is a good idea for obvious reasons. Elected officials value written correspondence, believe it or not, more than other correspondence according to all of my friends that are staffers (I was a public policy major). A staffer once told me that when the Senator he worked for received a hand written letter, they knew it took more time and effort than an e-mail or phone call, and that they had a ratio of how many other constituents must feel the same way. It takes the cost of an envelope and stamp, but a letter goes a long ways. Be thoughtful in your letter, present facts, be respectful, and get to the point.
  2. Volunteer for a campaign or organization – You not have money, but chances are you have time. Volunteer for a reputable campaign or organization. Just be aware that there are a lot of jerks out there that will use you up, take credit for your efforts when results are achieved, and scapegoat you because you don’t come from means when results aren’t achieved. Don’t let that discourage you from volunteering, but just keep it in mind. I’ve seen many FANTASTIC activists get chewed up and spit out, which resulted in them walking away from activism entirely, and that’s sad. I was almost there many times myself, but I was fortunate enough to have mentors that pointed this out to me early on. 

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Disturbing Dash Cam Footage Surfaces of Teen Killed by Cop Over Marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Wed, October, 28th 2015 by THCFinder

Prosecutors announced on Tuesday that the South Carolina police officer who fatally shot 19-year-old Zachary Hammond during a pot bust this summer will not face criminal charges. The decision was based on a review of disturbing dash cam footage—which authorities had reportedly refused to release to the public until this week. 

According to Greenville Online, 10th Circuit Solicitor Chrissy Adams said that after evaluating the video frame by frame, she concluded that Lt. Mark Tiller was "justified in firing on the unarmed 19-year-old to protect himself and others from being run over by  Hammond's car." However, she also admitted that the newly released footage is "troublesome" and "demands answers."

Tiller shot and killed Hammond on July 26 during a sting operation after police were tipped off that Hammond's friend, who was also in the car, was planning to sell a small amount of marijuana. Tiller claimed that he was in danger of being run over by Hammond's car when he shot the teen, but the new video doesn't exactly match Tiller's story.

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