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Taco Bell, Del Taco Unahppy About Names Being Used in Marijuana Expo Ad

Category: News | Posted on Sun, June, 30th 2013 by THCFinder
kushexpo-problemsDespite the fact that potheads love Taco Bell, Taco Bell is not cool with being associated with weed in advertisements. Neither a Taco Bell nor a Del Taco in Orange County, Calif. want their names associated with a marijuana expo set for next week in Anaheim. The Kush Expo will blow through the Anaheim Convention Center on Jul. 6 and Jul. 7, and both taco chains are mentioned in promos. They aren't having it.
 
Del Taco spokeswoman Barbara Caruso said "It's unacceptable for companies to use our logo without permission and they didn't have permission." Rob Poetsch, spokesman for Taco Bell, voiced similar frustrations. "We have a longstanding policy that prohibits other businesses from using our trademarks, and we did not give them permission to do this."
 
Poetsch added that Taco Bell was "in the process of contacting them to take down our trademarks from their website, but it appears that they have already taken them down." The Kush Expo is advertised as "the world's biggest medical marijuana mega show," with prizes, giveaways and even a "Hot Kush Girl" contest. That sounds like a stoner's paradise, but Taco Bell and Del Taco will have no official affiliation.
 

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California Supreme Court Decides Police Need Warrant to Open Package That Smells Like Marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Sat, June, 29th 2013 by THCFinder
warrent-for-semelly-boxes
Yesterday, the California Supreme Court decided that police needed to secure a warrant to open a package that smelled like marijuana. Santa Barbara County prosecutors argued that packages should be searched using the "plain smell" logic, and extension of the "plain sight" rule which allows authorities to seize and search anything clearly visible. 
 
Authorities were allowed to seize package, they just needed a warrant to open it. This all stems from a case where a FedEx package contained 444 grams of marijuana; the sender was accused of shipping and selling it. Police seized the package after a FedEx employee complained that it reeked of marijuana and later opened it at the police station.
 
The case's defendant is definitely happy, as the evidence has to be suppressed because it wasn't searched lawfully. 
 

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Marijuana's march toward mainstream confounds feds

Category: News | Posted on Sat, June, 29th 2013 by THCFinder
feds-confusedWASHINGTON—It took 50 years for American attitudes about marijuana to zigzag from the paranoia of "Reefer Madness" to the excesses of Woodstock back to the hard line of "Just Say No."
 
The next 25 years took the nation from Bill Clinton, who famously "didn't inhale," to Barack Obama, who most emphatically did.
 
Now, in just a few short years, public opinion has moved so dramatically toward general acceptance that even those who champion legalization are surprised at how quickly attitudes are changing and states are moving to approve the drug—for medical use and just for fun.
 
It is a moment in America that is rife with contradictions:
—People are looking more kindly on marijuana even as science reveals more about the drug's potential dangers, particularly for young people.
—States are giving the green light to the drug in direct defiance of a federal prohibition on its use.
—Exploration of the potential medical benefit is limited by high federal hurdles to research.
Washington policymakers seem reluctant to deal with any of it.
Richard Bonnie, a University of Virginia law professor who worked for a national commission that recommended decriminalizing marijuana in 1972, sees the public taking a big leap from prohibition to a more laissez-faire approach without full deliberation.
 
"It's a remarkable story historically," he says. "But as a matter of public policy, it's a little worrisome."
 

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Cowboys DT Josh Brent jailed after testing positive for marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Fri, June, 28th 2013 by THCFinder
nfl-player-arrestedDallas Cowboys defensive tackle Josh Brent is in Dallas County jail after testing positive for marijuana last week, violating the terms of his $100,000 bond, Selwyn Crawford of the Dallas Morning News reports.
 
Brent has been out on bail while awaiting trial on an intoxicated manslaughter charge following a Dec. 8, 2012 incident that claimed the life of Jerry Brown, a linebacker on the Cowboys' practice squad and Brent's former teammate at the University of Illinois. Brent's blood-alcohol level was 0.18, over twice the legal limit, when his Mercedes S600 struck a curb, overturned and caught fire.
 
A urinalysis test in May revealed that Brent had "tested positive for marijuana and marijuana metabolite". On May 24, Dallas County prosecutors sought to revoke Brent's bond, accusing him of either drinking alcohol or being around alcohol, both of which would be violations of his bail. The SCRAM bracelet on Brent's ankle had also failed to log data on 22 occasions.
 
During a bond revocation hearing on June 6, State District Judge Robert D. Burns III declined the prosecutor's request, but did order further alcohol monitoring of Brent while scheduling an additional hearing for July 19.
 

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CU-Boulder Spent $108K To Shut Down 4/20 Marijuana Party In 2013

Category: News | Posted on Fri, June, 28th 2013 by THCFinder
rally-shutdown
The University of Colorado spent $107,794 this year on its efforts to end the 4/20 smoke-out by shutting down the campus to outside visitors, officials announced today.
 
CU's spending was roughly $17,000 less than it was in 2012, the inaugural year that CU closed its campus to the public and shut down Norlin Quad entirely.
 
In previous years, CU's unsanctioned 4/20 smoke-out had drawn more than 12,000 revelers to the quad, causing what CU officials say was a disruption to the school's academic mission.
 
"While this is not money we are eager to spend, we have to ask ourselves what the costs are to us for having our work disrupted or having a student or bystander injured because we allowed the gathering on the campus," Chancellor Phil DiStefano said in a statement.
 
Costs for this year's 4/20 campus closure were as follows:
 
--$70,850 for CU police/security/dispatcher/parking overtime and labor costs for officers from outside agencies;
 
--$9,881 for Argus security staff assisting with police/parking operations;
 
--$4,431 for fire department/ambulance coverage;
 
--$12,025 on miscellaneous expenses, including equipment, supplies, operations facility rental, printing, and food and water for personnel;
 
--$5,016 for parking equipment/rentals, such as cones, barricades and variable message signs noting the campus closure; and
 
--$5,591 for overtime labor costs in facilities management (groundskeeping, locksmiths and other facilities employees).
 
There was no public smoke-out on the Boulder campus this year. Last year, there was a small smoke-out of about 300 people on a field near the Duane Physics building.
 

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Google Quietly Giving Aid To Marijuana Activists

Category: News | Posted on Thu, June, 27th 2013 by THCFinder
google-helping-marijuana-actCancer patients who Google the words "chemotherapy nausea" today get a host of advertisements for treatment, including pills, skin patches and folk remedies used to prevent vomiting. Next month, however, the same search will turn up an ad for something a bit more controversial: medical marijuana.
 
The change comes courtesy of the charitable unit of Google, which last week gifted a Michigan medical marijuana advocacy group $120,000 worth of its services. As part of the grant, the group, Michigan Compassion, will be able to promote medical marijuana use through Google's popular AdWords platform -- the plain-text advertisements that pop up to the right side of any given search result.
 
Michigan Compassion does not sell marijuana but connects patients and growers, and it says the ads will appear alongside searches likely to be made by chemotherapy patients.
 
“The goal is to link the negative effects of chemotherapy and the positive effects of cannabis,” Amish Parikh, vice-president of Michigan Compassion, told The Huffington Post.
 
The ads' value is small in the scheme of Google's AdWords program, which brings in over $40 billion per year in revenue, but they represent a change for the Mountain View, Calif. firm, which has a strict policy against hosting ads for marijuana-related searches.
 
Google's new generosity toward marijuana advocates fits neatly in Silicon Valley, however, where tech companies and their employees have been quietly contributing to cannabis activism, an area attorney involved in the marijuana legalization movement told The Huffington Post.
 

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